Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace
Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace
Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace
Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace
Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace
Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace
Life returns to the Palacio del Segundo Cabo Palace

The palace of el Segundo Cabo shines again, one of the three most important Cuban colonial architecture works, representative of the XVIII century baroque, turned into a new type museum: Center for Interpretation of Cuba-Europe Cultural Relations.

Located in the Plaza de Armas Square, the palace, whose construction began in 1772, has beautiful arches in its façade with a wide porch, a majestic entrance and a hallway giving way to an Andalusian patio.  It was the seat of the Royal Treasury, the Senate, the academies of History and Arts and Literature, as well as the Cuban Book Institute, until 2009 when as part of the project of patrimonial rescue and cultural development with the collaboration of UNESCO and the European Union, it regained its splendor and was adapted for a new museum function without compromising its architectural image.

Projected from the integral perspective of the new museum trends, this museum is interactive and participative: it employs modern technologies as tools to bring visitors closer to the contents, history, literature and art, but above all to the commonly shared legacy. Eusebio Leal, City Historian viewed it as something totally different, to interpret cultural relations between Cuba and Europe.

Every hall required multidisciplinary work, since different from a conventional museum, visitors interact as processes using technology, generating in themselves a personalized didactic experience and may elect what audiovisual they want to see or, in the visiting room, what chronicle about legendary city walkers who passed by the Island they want to listen to.

It focuses from a different perspective on the exchange between Cuba and the Old Continent; it shows elements that have modeled the national identity; it opens new spaces to promote cultural exchange, generate research or receive projects related to the artistic or intellectual patrimony of both geographies and hosts events of European nations.

Considered as one of the most modern museums of the country, in this “time tunnel” it harmonizes a contemporary museum proposal in a colonial space of high degree of patrimonial protection.

By: Alina Dupré